PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURES
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DUTIES

OF BOARD MEMBERS

Presiding Officer

Vice-President

Treasurer

Secretary

Auditing Committee

Parliamentarian

Tellers

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDING OFFICER .

 

The presiding officer is called by many names. The printable ones are: chairman, president, or presiding officer. Sometimes the mayor of the town presides over council as part of his job (as the Vice President of the U.S. presides over the U.S. Senate). In the U.S. House of Representatives the presiding officer is called "Speaker." But no matter what his name, no matter how much variance there is in specific rules, the general rules are identical:

 

The presiding officer must:

  • Be fair-yet firm;

  • Never engage in debate (without first relinquishing the chair)

  • Assure good order-by preventing indecent language, disorder or unfairness among members.

  • Make certain assembly knows the issue on the floor and the issue being voted on.

  • Be familiar with the rules of procedure.

  • DUTIES OF THE VICE PRESIDENT .

    To be ready to take over the chair in case of the absence or illness of the presiding officer. Rules vary considerably from organization to organization, but there is no necessity for the vice president to assume he will automatically become president upon the retirement of the president.   

    DUTIES OF THE TREASURER .

     

    All too frequently the job of treasurer is treated as if it were an honor, rather than a responsibility. The treasurer should be experienced in money matters, for in an organization of some size, the work requires someone with knowledge and experience.

    The treasurer must be able to document with receipts, invoices and checks, all sources of income and all expenditures. Informality and organization accounting do not mix.

    As with any officer of an organization who handles money, the treasurer should be bonded. The amount and type of the bond and the method of procuring it can be determined by any reputable bonding company or insurance agent.

    Yearly, the treasurer must submit his report of all expenditures and income to an auditing committee. The treasurer should submit a summary of this report to the entire organization, providing the totals only of receipts and expenditures for the year, plus the amount of balance on hand.

     

    DUTIES OF THE SECRETARY .

     

    While much of the secretary's work is the taking and recording of accurate minutes of the proceedings, this is not the sum total of his duties. He must also:

    1. Be able to advise the presiding officer and the membership of the issue "on the floor”.

    2. Keep an accurate list of members in good standing and call roll when requested to.

    3. Keep adequate files, including copies of reports "received and filed"; plus keeping available documents like By-Laws and constitution.

    4. Be responsible for the agenda, including items for which "orders" were created; items postponed; items under “old business."

    5. To correspond with members when necessary, including the sending of notices of special meetings.

    6. To correspond with non-members or outside organizations whenever this is required by organization business. Where this task is particularly burdensome, a corresponding secretary may be appointed to relieve the regular secretary of this function.

    DUTIES OF THE AUDITING COMMITTEE .  

    It is the auditing committee's responsibility to check the treasurer's accounts thoroughly and report the findings to the organization. The auditing committee is often a standing committee of the organization.

    DUTIES OF THE PARLIAMENTARIAN .

     

    While it is very desirable that the presiding officer knows how to conduct a meeting, he may not know all the facts and technicalities of parliamentary procedure. It is most useful, Therefore, to find among the membership a knowledgeable person in the area of parliamentary procedure and appoint him as parliamentarian. Seated near the presiding officer, the parliamentarian can offer advice whenever the presiding officer needs it, can help anticipate and avoid a troublesome situation before it arises, can point out errors in procedure when they arise.

    The presiding officer is still responsible for his own decision, thus he may accept or reject the advice of the parliamentarian; but he (the presiding officer) is not above the By-Laws of the organization, nor the established rules of parliamentary procedure.

     

    DUTIES OF THE TELLERS .

     

    The tellers are those members designated to control the mechanics of an election. They distribute the blank ballots to all entitled to vote, collect these ballots, count them and report their findings to the assembly or to the presiding officer.

    In most organizations, the tellers are appointed by the presiding officer. In some organizations tellers are selected by the membership for a designated term of duty.

     

      

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